State Officers

In addition to our board of directors, SkillsUSA Idaho is led by a team of student officers that work to advocate for and improve the SkillsUSA experience for our chapters. Students may run for state office at the Spring State Leadership Conference. More information will be sent out as we finalize the details of the event. If you would like to know more about what it’s like to be a State officer you can email one of our officers below.

Audrey Norris

2022-2023 Postsecondary President

Area of Occupational Training: Computer Science

As a SkillsUSA state officer I have been able to develop my confidence and leadership skills. Using what I’ve learned, I want to become a leader that can help others improve their abilities as well. Many students don’t realize that despite their age there are still many opportunities for them out there, and I want to be able to help them find those opportunities.

I am attending BSU in pursuit of a bachelors degree in computer science and participate in the GIMM program. I enjoy computer science because it allows me to help people come up with solutions to problems they may have.

Email: anorris@skillsidaho.org


Bailey Jensen

2022-2023 High School President

Chapter: Dennis Technical Education Center

Area of Occupational Training: Precision Machining Technology

Email: bjensen@skillsidaho.org

Takota Tallman

2022-2023 High School Vice President

Chapter: Dennis Technical Education Center

Area of Occupational Training: Precision Machining Technology

Email: ttallman@skillsidaho.org

Christopher McKenzie

2022-2023 High School Secretary

Chapter: Dennis Technical Education Center

Area of Occupational Training: Welding

Email: cmckenzie@skillsidaho.org


State Officer FAQ

Here are a few questions we asked the state officers about their time as a state officer. If you have any questions you would like to be added to the list or just want to ask them you can email them or use our contact form.

How did you become a state officer? What made you interested in the position?
  • A: I vividly remember my first opening ceremony and getting to see all of the state officers up there leading the session. It made me want to become a better leader and help others in the same way that they did. Thanks to Kayla and some of the other state officers encouraging me I was able to obtain that goal.
  • K: I became a State Officer because of the mentorship and encouragement from my chapter advisor, Mrs. Deitchler. Mrs. Deitchler has been a positive mentor and helped me grow and learn through SkillsUSA. I have appreciated her support and undeniable dedication to promoting me to be my personal best. As I look at Mrs. Deitchler and the positive influence she and other mentors in SkillsUSA have had on my life, I strive to inspire others through mentoring and teamwork. 
What is your favorite thing about being a state officer?
  • A: I think one of the best things about being a state officer is getting to know all of the members of the state and other state officers from different states. I’ve been able to learn about everyone’s experiences and perspectives and find so many common interests with them! I think my favorite thing however, is that I get to help others learn about SkillsUSA, and leadership in the same way other officers have done for me.
  • K: As a State Officer, I have had the opportunity to travel across the state of Idaho and meet a variety of SkillsUSA members. I have been inspired, by the hard work and strong leadership, of the various SkillsUSA chapters. These experiences have helped me develop personal leadership skills as I have helped new chapters train to the SkillsUSA Framework. More importantly, I have made new friends from all over the state. Including other State Officers in the Career Technical State Organizations (CTSO’s), such as TSA, HOSA, BPA, FFA, FCCLA, and DECA! This has shown me the amazing group of future leaders Idaho has across its vast state.
What are some challenges you have had to overcome?
  • A: I think the biggest challenge was learning how to lead without a team behind you. Before this year I always had other officers to help me figure out what to do and fix any problems that happen. Because there are only two officers we have to take on a lot of work that we wouldn’t normally do. I might be the President but now I also dabble in note taking, reporting, and parliamentary procedure!
  • K: One of the challenges I had to overcome as a State Officer was providing SkillsUSA competitions in a virtual format to meet CDC social distancing rules that were in place. The experience was difficult as SkillsUSA had never hosted an online event before. The State Officers worked together to provide a virtual online competition incorporating presentations, virtual games, and collaboration with vendors for networking opportunities for students. The team also had to troubleshoot the virtual platform to solve technical issues for the SkillsUSA competitors. This experience helped me discover practical life skills, face challenges, and look for alternative solutions. While stressful at the time, I believe this helped with my leadership skills as it prepared me to be a better leader. 
Did you have an officer position before this?
  • A: Yes, before this year I was my school’s local chapter president (2020-2021) where most of the officers had never been officers before. I think that helped with this year though because I had a better understanding of every officer’s duties and responsibilities. In addition to being the president I also was the local secretary (2019-2020).
  • K: Yes! This is my fourth year as an officer, the second year at the state level, and my fifth year in SkillsUSA overall. I am currently the SkillsUSA Postsecondary President (2021 – 2022). I was the SkillsUSA President last year (2020-2021). Prior to being a State Officer, I participated in my local chapter through various leadership positions. I served as the treasurer (2019-2020) and the secretary (2018-2019). These previous experiences have certainly helped in my current role. But, please know the SkillsUSA team is fantastic to work with, and anyone interested in applying to become a State Officer, regardless of prior leadership positions, should give it a go! 
What advice would you give to someone who is interested in becoming a state officer?
  • A: Don’t tell yourself you can’t do something because you don’t think you have the skills to do it! Part of becoming a state officer is learning how to be a good leader, no one expects you to be perfect (What would be the point of developing leadership skills if you were right?). A good officer is built on their willingness to work as a team and improve, not on natural skill.
  • K: Go for it! If you are interested in becoming a State Officer, I would highly recommend it. My experience as a State Officer has made a positive impact on my leadership skills, soft skills, and technical skills. I would highly encourage anyone considering becoming a State Officer to look into it. After deciding whether this is the right fit for you, talk to your advisor about steps moving forward. 
What is your favorite memory or thing you’ve done as a state officer?
  • A: Probably when we went to DTech and I got to teach presentation skills. I had a section where I talked about the importance of eye contact. While I was talking about how some people psych themselves out because they don’t want to get into a staring contest I locked eyes with one of the students. It took them a few seconds to realize what I was doing but the look on their face told me I had proved my point and made some other students laugh. That spur of the moment decision has created a bit that I want to keep using for the rest of my time as a state officer.
  • K: As a State Officer, one of my favorite memories has been starting a SkillsUSA Chapter at Boise State University(BSU). I am particularly proud of this accomplishment as it entailed multiple steps and procedures during the creation of the chapter. I needed to write and edit a constitution for the chapter, find an advisor, encourage participation from students, and build relations within the Boise State community. I also reached out to other sources to help network and maintain this project’s momentum. Overall, I am very excited about the opportunities this chapter will create for many students in the years to come; through competition, networking, and professional development.